jelenawoehr:

This is what racism looks like.

Racism is the utter lack of compassion it takes to see a mother grieving for a boy and afraid for her own sons, and think, “Wow, that would be really easy to tweak in Photoshop to make her look stupid. Wouldn’t that be funny?” 

Racism is dehumanizing. Racism robs this woman of her individuality, her humanity, and her gender. “And ain’t I a woman?” This mother ain’t a woman to “The Patriot Nation.” She’s an object to be ridiculed for mistakes she never made; mistakes, in fact, that someone intentionally added to a photo of her for the purpose of mocking her grief and fear.

Racism is someone in front of his computer whose face twists into the same mask of disgust we see in grainy old black and white films of the KKK burning schoolhouses and churches, and instead of a racial slur spilling from his curled-back lips, he sneers, “Sheeple,” or “Socialists,” or “Obamanation,” and he clicks “like” and “share” on this photo because there’s no little switch in his brain to say: “Is this right to do to a human being?” No. The filter turns off when his hate is triggered by this image. And the really scary thing is, that missing filter means he’s also missing the ability to honestly ask himself, “Am I responding this way because of this woman’s race?” 

This is also what courage looks like, over there on the left.

Courage is a woman who knows damn good and well that there are people in the world who will use and abuse anything she does in the public eye to slander her, her community, and the sons on whose behalf she’s protesting.

Courage is a woman with her head held high holding a protest sign of her own making in front of a news camera. She is old enough to have three sons. Surely, she has experienced racism before. Surely, she was raised to “never ever forget [she] was born on parole,” and surely she knows that speaking for her sons means taking risks with her own image, her own safety, and her own reputation. 

The cost of courage in nonviolent protest has changed. Those who march peacefully may no longer risk firehoses and police dogs’ bites (though they do risk being attacked with chemical weapons), but they now risk digital slander as impossible to remove from the Internet as unflattering photos of Beyonce.

One acute injury, one arrest, or a lifetime of being “the stupid woman with the misspelled sign” online when you KNOW damn well you can spell “sons” (and so can all of your sons, for that matter)? Dog bite, or teenage niece who gets on Facebook for the first time calling to ask why auntie doesn’t know how to spell?

I think I’d take the dog bite, personally. 

 

Showing my work: The racist photoshopped image was found on Facebook. Use of FotoForensics validated my assumption (based on jpeg artifacts) it had been resaved repeatedly. A Google reverse image search using the photoshopped image revealed the original. I used SnagIt to create the side by side comparison here. To his credit, the friend who first shared the fake version retracted it and declared it “despicable” after being shown the original photo.

I obviously do not own the original, but I grant any and all permission to use the above comparison image for purposes related to rescuing this anonymous woman’s reputation from racist attempts to depict her in unflattering and false ways via sharing of a “meme” anywhere, in perpetuity. As an additional sidenote, if anyone knows the woman depicted, please give her a hug from me. 

(via phoning-it-in)

Timestamp: 1377114672

jelenawoehr:

This is what racism looks like.

Racism is the utter lack of compassion it takes to see a mother grieving for a boy and afraid for her own sons, and think, “Wow, that would be really easy to tweak in Photoshop to make her look stupid. Wouldn’t that be funny?” 

Racism is dehumanizing. Racism robs this woman of her individuality, her humanity, and her gender. “And ain’t I a woman?” This mother ain’t a woman to “The Patriot Nation.” She’s an object to be ridiculed for mistakes she never made; mistakes, in fact, that someone intentionally added to a photo of her for the purpose of mocking her grief and fear.

Racism is someone in front of his computer whose face twists into the same mask of disgust we see in grainy old black and white films of the KKK burning schoolhouses and churches, and instead of a racial slur spilling from his curled-back lips, he sneers, “Sheeple,” or “Socialists,” or “Obamanation,” and he clicks “like” and “share” on this photo because there’s no little switch in his brain to say: “Is this right to do to a human being?” No. The filter turns off when his hate is triggered by this image. And the really scary thing is, that missing filter means he’s also missing the ability to honestly ask himself, “Am I responding this way because of this woman’s race?” 

This is also what courage looks like, over there on the left.

Courage is a woman who knows damn good and well that there are people in the world who will use and abuse anything she does in the public eye to slander her, her community, and the sons on whose behalf she’s protesting.

Courage is a woman with her head held high holding a protest sign of her own making in front of a news camera. She is old enough to have three sons. Surely, she has experienced racism before. Surely, she was raised to “never ever forget [she] was born on parole,” and surely she knows that speaking for her sons means taking risks with her own image, her own safety, and her own reputation. 

The cost of courage in nonviolent protest has changed. Those who march peacefully may no longer risk firehoses and police dogs’ bites (though they do risk being attacked with chemical weapons), but they now risk digital slander as impossible to remove from the Internet as unflattering photos of Beyonce.

One acute injury, one arrest, or a lifetime of being “the stupid woman with the misspelled sign” online when you KNOW damn well you can spell “sons” (and so can all of your sons, for that matter)? Dog bite, or teenage niece who gets on Facebook for the first time calling to ask why auntie doesn’t know how to spell?

I think I’d take the dog bite, personally. 

 

Showing my work: The racist photoshopped image was found on Facebook. Use of FotoForensics validated my assumption (based on jpeg artifacts) it had been resaved repeatedly. A Google reverse image search using the photoshopped image revealed the original. I used SnagIt to create the side by side comparison here. To his credit, the friend who first shared the fake version retracted it and declared it “despicable” after being shown the original photo.

I obviously do not own the original, but I grant any and all permission to use the above comparison image for purposes related to rescuing this anonymous woman’s reputation from racist attempts to depict her in unflattering and false ways via sharing of a “meme” anywhere, in perpetuity. As an additional sidenote, if anyone knows the woman depicted, please give her a hug from me. 

(via phoning-it-in)

"House Republicans Meet at a Former Slave Plantation to Practice Talking to Black People"

ladythatsmyskull:

People have expressed how baffled they are at the decision to hold a conference on Women and Minorities at a former Slave-Era Plantation.

“House Republicans Meet at a Former Slave Plantation to Practice Talking to Black People”

Myself, I have no doubt that Republicans know exactly what they are doing 99% of the time. Their defeat in the last Presidential election was a near thing and they are already introducing legislation to ensure any votes against them are minimized. No political organization can be so repeatedly publicly incompetent and survive as long as they have unless they can weather the storm with sandbags full of cash. They hold events and utter the most crazed statements that appear designed to provoke the biggest noise from the most vocal niche demographic.

Promoting fear, bigotry and hate are all actions and speech calculated to ensure their wingnut voting base gets off the couch, buys guns in a paranoid rage and maintains their death-grip on a worn bible they have barely read much less understand. They fight transparency, suppress votes, strangle freedom and liberty and promote villains as heroes. Nearly everything the GOP does seems to ensure they stop people from thriving.

I often speculate that it’s likely politicians really can’t stand the base they represent. That goes for Republicans, Democrats and all others, really. It’s like most politicians consider themselves above their constituency, know what’s best and are rarely open to ideas or positive change unless publicly humiliated into to doing so. Few are uneducated but they pretend anyone who has improved themselves is an out of touch elitist. They subsist on Government service, take full advantage of the labyrinthine tax code to their benefit but wag a finger at anyone else trying to save ten dollars on their annual income. It feels like mostly they act only when some powerful donor or organization has a checkbook and a pen or a smartphone app that can make big dollar wire transfer donations to their campaign or soft money accounts.

amazonpoodle:

The first time I saw STXI I saw it alone. My stepdad was at the movie theatre with me, but it was PACKED so we had to sit separately. Give me a minute to talk you through my introduction-to-Nyota-Uhura feelings.

I love her. I love her from the start. I confess I am predisposed to love Zoe Saldana, but — the start of that bar scene! I’m floating down from Spock’s spectacular Vulcan mic drop, and that funky music starts playing, and then we’re given Uhura. She walks with so much attitude, her hair swishing behind her, and the camera moves with her as she moves: she dances through the crowded bar, she bends to greet the people who reach out to her, she smiles and laughs but never truly pauses. I understand what the movie’s telling me, because it’s clear. She’s dynamic and quick and good-humored and beloved, and she’s got places to go and things to do.

She gets to the bar and even the alien, who presumably has totally different standards of beauty, knows she’s hot. Kirk tries to pick her up, and it’s great, because the audience has expectations. Even if you’ve never seen the original series — and at that point, I hadn’t — almost everybody knows that Kirk is a ladies’ man, irresistible throughout the galaxies to female people, regardless of their actual species. But he is extremely resistible to Uhura. How great is this? I’m primed to like Kirk; I know he’s going to be the hero of the movie, I already know he’s lost a lot and that he’s reckless and brave and ridiculous — but how can I not like Uhura? Thanks but no thanks, her drink’s on her. She doesn’t care that Kirk’s the hero of the movie. She’s not turning him down to be difficult; it’s just that she knows what she wants, and it’s not him.

How often in pop culture are black girls allowed to be gorgeous, dynamic, quick, good-humored, and beloved, and immune to the charms of a charming white boy hero with blue eyes and a beautiful mouth? What an uncommon amount of power this narrative’s given her, and in her first scene. The audience isn’t immune to Kirk. Robot cops aren’t immune to Kirk. Captain Pike isn’t immune to Kirk. But Uhura is. It’s too late. I’m in love.

Read More

This is amazing. A must read.

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Coretta Scott King Quotes
On Lesbian and Gay Rights, On Homophobia

• Lesbian and gay people are a permanent part of the American workforce, who currently have no protection from the arbitrary abuse of their rights on the job. For too long, our nation has tolerated the insidious form of discrimination against this group of Americans, who have worked as hard as any group, paid their taxes like everyone else, and yet have been denied equal protection under the law.

• I believe all Americans who believe in freedom, tolerance and human rights have a responsibility to oppose bigotry and prejudice based on sexual orientation.

• I still hear people say that I should not be talking about the rights of lesbian and gay people and I should stick to the issue of racial justice. But I hasten to remind them that Martin Luther King Jr. said, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.”

• I appeal to everyone who believes in Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream to make room at the table of brother- and sisterhood for lesbian and gay people.

• We have to launch a national campaign against homophobia in the black community.

• Homophobia is like racism and anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry in that it seeks to dehumanize a large group of people, to deny their humanity, their dignity and personhood. This sets the stage for further repression and violence that spread all too easily to victimize the next minority group.

• Gays and lesbians stood up for civil rights in Montgomery, Selma, in Albany, Ga. and St. Augustine, Fla., and many other campaigns of the Civil Rights Movement. Many of these courageous men and women were fighting for my freedom at a time when they could find few voices for their own, and I salute their contributions.

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